Well I'm a 27yr old gay man, that horse trains for a living, do Native American dancing, and going to college for Web-design. I also in my spare time like to design graphics. I'm engaged to a wonderful man, and trying to stay warm in Michigan. Easier said than done right now. Lol!

 

Sorry I haven’t been keeping up with things, due to my land lord who we shared internet with decide to choose dishnet, and mike and I won’t be able to use it. :/ well started off nicely, I did the cardinal in of not making sure my keys were in hand before I locked my house door. I hate Mondays with a passion sometimes, and now I am all set to horse show this coming Sunday. Wish me luck, and I will make sure to take a lot of pictures to post. 

My other graphic, I know there r a couple flaws

My other graphic, I know there r a couple flaws

I  made this graphic in one of my semesters in college. The idea of it was to have a super power.

I  made this graphic in one of my semesters in college. The idea of it was to have a super power.

Human tales? Humans don’t have tails, they have big big bottoms that they where with bad shorts. They walk around going HI HELEN!

From my favorite childhood movie FernGully. Batty was my favorite.

nativeamericannews:

Native Languages of the Cherokee (Tsalagi)
Language Cherokee–more properly spelled Tsalagi–is an Iroquoian language with an innovative written syllabary invented by a Native Cherokee scholar. 22,000 people speak the Cherokee language today, primarily in Oklahoma and North Carolina. Though it is one of the healthier Indian languages of North America and the one in which the most literature has been published, the Cherokee language is still in imperiled condition because of government policies as late as the fifties which enforced the removal of Cherokee children from Cherokee-speaking homes, reducing the number of young Cherokees being raised

nativeamericannews:

Native Languages of the Cherokee (Tsalagi)


Language Cherokee–more properly spelled Tsalagi–is an Iroquoian language with an innovative written syllabary invented by a Native Cherokee scholar. 22,000 people speak the Cherokee language today, primarily in Oklahoma and North Carolina. Though it is one of the healthier Indian languages of North America and the one in which the most literature has been published, the Cherokee language is still in imperiled condition because of government policies as late as the fifties which enforced the removal of Cherokee children from Cherokee-speaking homes, reducing the number of young Cherokees being raised